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Chemical Exposures and Lead

Purpose

Kids playing in sandbox

The purpose of the Chemical Exposures Subcommittee is to understand and predict disease and disabilities from changing chemical exposures and metals, including lead, to children across their life stages. This subcommittee facilitates interagency coordination around priority chemical and lead exposure issues, and is a vehicle for coordinating research activities and educating the public.

The goals of this subcommittee include:

Accomplishments

Cross-Agency Biospecimen Resources Identification Activity

The Subcommittee identified a list of federal agency biospecimen resources that could provide for potential additional measurements of children's chemical exposures. Although the list was for internal government use, the realization that there was no central record of government-supported biobanks helped to lead to the creation of the Children’s Health Exposure Analysis Resource (CHEAR). The goal of CHEAR is to provide tools so researchers can assess the full range of environmental exposures that may affect children's health.

Eliminating Childhood Lead Poisoning: A Federal Strategy Targeting Lead Paint Hazards

In 2000, the Task Force released a set of recommendations aimed at eliminating childhood lead poisoning in the United States. The report focuses primarily on expanding efforts to correct lead paint hazards (especially in low-income housing), a major source of lead exposure for children.

Key Federal Programs to Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Eliminate Associated Health Impacts

This report of the President's Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children catalogs federal efforts to understand, prevent, and reduce various sources of lead exposure among children. The report, Key Federal Programs to Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Eliminate Associated Health Impacts, provides a starting point for a comprehensive federal lead strategy, and will enable increased coordination and collaboration among federal agencies to further protect the nation's children.

Resources

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